Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

CCL Makerspace

Makerspace at the Camden Carroll Library - Morehead State University


What is FDM 3D Printing Technology | Fused Deposition Modeling Additive Manufacturing - Proto3000 - (1:16)


Model, Slice, Print

Model: The printing process begins with a 3D model file of the object you would like to 3D print. A 3D model file can be produced in a 3D modeling program, by a 3D modeling service, or downloaded from an internet repository. The "Software and Tutorials" tab above will provide examples, resources, and tutorials for each. Models for 3D Printing should preferably be in .STL (stereolythography) format.

Slice: Slicing is the process of turning a 3D model, along with some parameters that you determine, into a set of instructions for the printer with a program called a Slicer. Usually a .gcode or .gx file, this file gives the printer instructions on every movement that needs to be made, on a series of 2D layers, each printed on top of the next from the bed up, resulting in a 3d print. More information on slicer programs can be found above.

Print: When a sliced model is ready to print, the machine is cleaned and prepped, the file is selected, the machine is heated to the specifications set during slicing, then the machine starts a mostly automated process until the 3D print is complete. The speed of printing is case-by-case, depending on the quality, the complexity of the model, and many other factors. While a simple keychain may take 30 minutes to print, a soda can model could take upwards of 10 hours. After printing, post processing can be performed, such as removing support structures, sanding, and painting. 



FDM 3D Printing: How to prototype like a pro - 3D Hubs - (10:17)



Top 5 3D Printing Myths and Misconceptions - Maker's Muse - (6:03)



3D Printing- The Future of Education - MatterHackers - (4:42)

Modeling

The printing process begins with a 3D model file of the object you would like to 3D print. A 3D model file can be produced in a 3D modeling program, by a 3D modeling service, or downloaded from an internet repository. The "Software and Tutorials" tab above will provide examples, resources, and tutorials for each. Models for 3D Printing should preferably be in .STL (stereolythography) format.


• TinkerCAD

Tinkercad Screenshot"Tinkercad is a free online collection of software tools that help people all over the world think, create and make. We’re the ideal introduction to Autodesk, the leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software."

Autodesk provides a beginner friendly, cloud based 3D modeling program and much more with Tinkercad. The application runs in-browser, making modeling available on most modern machines, as well as offering easy remote access to projects. The tools are a great introduction to 3D modeling, while still offering some advanced and unique features.


Eazy Beginner TinkerCAD Project: Keychain/ Bag Tag - Matthew Gudenius - (10:00) Make Simple Eiffel Tower With Tinkercad - Eunny - (4:32) Tinkercad Tutorial - Organic Shapes - CUG Labs - (19:46)

• Fusion 360

Fusion360 ScreenshotA more advanced product by Autodesk, Fusion 360 packs industry leading functionality into a one year free trial for personal and student use. The program is great for multi-part, precise mechanical designs, offering various analysis methods to ensure form, fit, and function of the design, as well as complex geometric surface modeling, handling a wide range of non-native model types for editing and repair.
 

"Fusion 360™ is a cloud-based 3D CAD/CAM tool for product development that combines industrial and mechanical design, collaboration, and machining in a single package. Fusion 360 enables fast and easy exploration of design ideas with an integrated concept-to-production platform."

 


undefined undefined undefined
Fusion 360 Tutorial for Absolute Beginners (2020) - Product Design Online - (34:31) Surface Modeling With Fusion 360 - Autodesk Fusion 360 - (13:34) How to Sculpt the New Fusion 360 LogoAutodesk Fusion 360 - (23:02)
 

• Blender

undefined"Tinkercad is a free online collection of software tools that help people all over the world think, create and make. We’re the ideal introduction to Autodesk, the leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software."

Autodesk provides a beginner friendly, cloud based 3D modeling program and much more with Tinkercad. The application runs in-browser, making modeling available on most modern machines, as well as offering easy remote access to projects. The tools are a great introduction to 3D modeling, while still offering some advanced and unique features.


undefined undefined undefined
Blender Beginner Tutorial- Part 1 - Blender Guru - (14:32) Getting Started with 3D Printing in BlenderMrTriPi - (10:28) Tutorial: How to Prepare Blender Files for 3D Printing - i.materialise - (10:30)

 

Slicing

The printing process begins with a 3D model file of the object you would like to 3D print. A 3D model file can be produced in a 3D modeling program, by a 3D modeling service, or downloaded from an internet repository. The "Software and Tutorials" tab above will provide examples, resources, and tutorials for each. Models for 3D Printing should preferably be in .STL (stereolythography) format.


• Cura

Tinkercad Screenshot"Tinkercad is a free online collection of software tools that help people all over the world think, create and make. We’re the ideal introduction to Autodesk, the leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software."

Autodesk provides a beginner friendly, cloud based 3D modeling program and much more with Tinkercad. The application runs in-browser, making modeling available on most modern machines, as well as offering easy remote access to projects. The tools are a great introduction to 3D modeling, while still offering some advanced and unique features.

Cost for 3D Printing

Cost will be determined by the projected weight of material used before printing (at $0.07 per gram of filament for standard materials) which can be quoted before commitment to the project. Payments can be made in the CCL Makerspace with Beaker Bucks only at the time of pick-up or completion.

Requests can be made in person at the Makerspace, or by using the "Request A Print" form on the tab above.

*Camden-Carroll Library insists that all users abide by local, state, and federal laws at all times, including all applicable United States copyright law (Title 17, U.S. Code), as well as all Morehead State University Policies and Student Conduct Codes. It is the responsibility of each user to ensure personal compliance with copyright law. Users must be respectful of the health and safety of other library patrons, and must use good faith in handling all machines, equipment, and materials provided by the library. Library staff reserves the right to deny any Makerspace project request for any reason.