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FYS "Plagues and People" Janelle Hare: Web Resources

The intent of the course is to establish the expectations of life in an academic setting and as a local, national and global citizen.

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Films on Demand--Microbial Diseases and Control

Criteria For Evaluating Information

The following criteria are appropriate for evaluating information of any kind. Evaluation is especially imporant when dealing with information found online. Review the following criteria and answer the questions based on the web page you are evaluating. A high quality source with quality information will enable you to answer MOST of the questions with a "YES."

 

Authority

Defines  who created the content,  the individual or group's credentials/expertise and provides contact information

  • Do you know who published the source?
  • Is the author's name easily visible?
  • What are the author's credentials and are they appropriate for the information provided?
  • Can you find contact information?
  • Is the source produced by a reputable organization?

Objectivity (Fairness)

Content is balanced, presenting all sides of an issue and multiple points-of-view

  • Are various points-of-view presented?
  • Is the source free of bias towards one point-of-view?
  • Is the objectivity of the source consistent with its purpose?
  • Is the source free of advertising?

Accuracy

Content is grammatically correct, verifiable and cited when necessary

  • Is the content grammatically correct?
  • Is the information accurate and verifiable?
  • Are sources and references cited?
  • Does the tone and style imply accuracy?

Scope (Relevancy)

Content is relevant to your topic or research

  • Does the purpose of the source (e.g. research, statistical, organizational) meet your needs?
  • Who is the intended audience? Will information directed to this audience meet your needs?
  • Is the information relevant to your research topic?

Currency

Information is current and updated frequently

  • Do you know when the information was originally published and is the date acceptable?
  • Do you know when the information was last updated and is the date acceptable?
  • Are web  links current and reliable?
  • Do charts and graphs have dates?

 

**Adapted from the original with permission, Eastern Kentucky University Libraries.

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